Sunday, January 29, 2017

Fall Photos of Our Best Time of Year For Some


                                                            Eurasian Collared-Doves


                                                               Eurasian Collared-Dove


                                                                    Blue-winged Teal


                                                               American White Pelican


                                                                   Male Carolina Wren


                                                            American Kestrel in Flight


                                                                      Carolina Wren
                                             

                                                            American White Pelican


10-19 through 11-09-16

This was when the weather was quite mild in the fall.  The Eurasian Collared-Doves were seen
for the first time not on the ground or on the power lines.  This was a rarer shot, so I did my best
to get out of the line of fire of the rising sun so that I could see them well enough in order to get
that beautiful photograph of them in the tree.  Fortunately, they trusted me enough to get away from a
large oak tree in order to have a clear shot.

The Blue-winged Teal, our smallest duck made a couple of turns around the lake, so I was as ready
as I could be to get a picture of several of them.  Even though they were quite a distance away, Lady Luck was with me, as was the sun.

The first Carolina Wren, an acquaintance, knows me better than the second one, who is generally
across the lake in a residential area.  By far, I believe the second shot to be the best one, but how could I refuse the first one?

The American Kestrel male has returned for the winter to his stomping grounds and this picture in
flight was a little sun washed, yet it was necessary to try it.

This American White Pelican was the first of a total of three arrivals.  He arrived on October 22 and
rested at Boomer Creek where there is a natural blind.  It was advantageous, as this waterbird had no
inkling that I was waiting silently in the wings.  There were a few shots of the birds flipping its gullet,
so these are representatives of this first meeting.